536 Signal Hill Drive Ext  |  Statesville, NC  28625  |  704-872-0234
31 E. Main Ave  |  Taylorsville, NC  28681
HomeSTARTServicesOur TeamScheduleMake A Referral


Addiction and Recovery Info
"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has classified prescription drug abuse as an epidemic."  (Office of National Drug Control Policy -- www.Whitehouse.gov)
Steps TAddiction Recovery Treatment
Make the S.T.A.R.T.
"Addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use despite harmful consequences."  (National Institute on Drug Abuse -- www.drugabuse.gov)

A DEFINITION OF ADDICTION


Addiction has been defined as “a chronic relapsing disease characterized by compulsive drug seeking and abuse and by long-lasting chemical changes in the brain.” (NIDA 2002) Traditionally, substance use disorders were seen as a moral failure or a weakness of will, however addiction is a chronic brain disease that can persist long after drug/alcohol use stops. The road to addiction starts with the act of taking a substance for a multitude of reasons, but over time the person’s ability to choose not to use is compromised and the continued indulgence becomes impulsive. Neuro imaging studies provide evidence that substance use is associated with physical changes in regions of the brain (i.e. the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, prefrontal cortex) that effect the brains functioning and emotional states. Historically, addiction treatment models are based on the perception that patients entering treatment should be cured and able to maintain lifelong abstinence following a brief single episode of specialized treatment. Indeed, the recovery process is marked by cycles of treatment, adherence, relapse, and repeated treatment before long term stable recovery is achieved. Similar to other chronic disease models such as diabetes, hypertension, and asthma, substance abuse disorders have comparable genetic predispositions, adherence rates, and relapse.

THE ROAD TO RECOVERY

Eight Principles Based on the Beatitudes
By, Pastor Rick Warren

Realize I’m not God. I admit that I am powerless to control my tendency to do the wrong thing and that my life is unmanageable. “Happy are those who know they are spiritually poor.” (Matthew 5:3)

Earnestly believe that God exists, that I matter to Him and that He has the power to help me recover. “Happy are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted” (Matthew 5:4)

Consciously choose to commit all my life and will to Christ’s care and control.
“Happy are the meek.” (Matthew 5:5)

Open examine and confess my faults to myself, to God, and to someone I trust.
“Happy are the pure in heart.” (Matthew 5:8)

Voluntarily submit to every change God wants to make in my life and humbly ask Him to remove my character defects.
“Happy are those whose greatest desire is to do what God requires.” (Matthew 5:6)

Evaluate all my relationships. Offer forgiveness to those who have hurt me and make amends for harm I’ve don’t to others, except when to do so would harm them or others.
“Happy are the merciful.” (Matthew 5:7)
“Happy are the peacemakers.” (Matthew 5:9)

Reserve a daily time with God for self-examination, Bible reading, and prayer in order to know God and His will for my life and to gain the power to follow His will.

Yield myself to God to be used to bring this Good News to others, both by my example and by my words.
“Happy are those who are persecuted because they do what God requires.” (Matthew 5:10)

ADDICTION IS A COMPLEX BUT TREATABLE DISEASE THAT AFFECTS BRAIN FUNCTION AND BEHAVIOR.

Drugs of abuse alter the brain’s structure and function, resulting in changes that persist long after drug use has ceased. This may explain why drug abusers are at risk for relapse even after long periods of abstinence and despite the potentially devastating consequences.

The National Institute of drug abuse has listed the following 13 principles of effective addictions treatment.

1. NO SINGLE TREATMENT IS APPROPRIATE FOR ALL INDIVIDUALS. 
Matching treatment settings, interventions, and services to an individual’s particular problems and needs is critical to his or her ultimate success in returning to productive functioning in the family, workplace, and society.

2. TREATMENT NEEDS TO BE READILY AVAILABLE. 
Because drug-addicted individuals may be uncertain about entering treatment, taking advantage of available services the moment people are ready for treatment is critical. Potential patients can be lost if treatment is not immediately available or readily accessible. As with other chronic diseases, the earlier treatment is offered in the disease process, the greater the likelihood of positive outcomes.

3. EFFECTIVE TREATMENT ATTENDS TO MULTIPLE NEEDS OF THE INDIVIDUAL. NOT JUST HIS OR HER DRUG ABUSE.
To be effective, treatment must address the individual’s drug abuse and any associated medical, psychological, social, vocational, and legal problems. It is also important that treatment be appropriate to the individual’s age, gender, ethnicity, and culture.

4. TREATMENT PLAN MUST BE ASSESSED CONTINUALLY TO ENSURE THAT IT MEETS CHANGING NEEDS. 
In addition to medication, the person may require varying combinations of services and treatment components, including: counseling or psychotherapy, medical services, family therapy, parenting instruction, vocational rehabilitation, and social and legal services.

5. REMAINING IN TREATMENT FOR AN ADEQUATE PERIOD OF TIME IS CRITICAL. 
The appropriate duration for an individual depends on the type and degree of his or her problems and needs. Research indicates that most addicted individuals need at least 3 months in treatment to significantly reduce or stop their drug use and the best outcomes occur with longer durations of treatment. Recovery from drug addiction is a long-term process and frequently requires multiple episodes of treatment. As with other chronic illnesses, relapses to drug abuse can occur and should signal a need for treatment to be reinstated or adjusted. Because individuals often leave treatment prematurely, programs should include strategies to engage and keep patients in treatment.

6. COUNSELING (INDIVIDUAL AND/OR GROUP) AND OTHER BEHAVIORAL THERAPIES ARE CRITICAL COMPONENTS OF EFFECTIVE TREATMENT. 
Behavioral therapies vary in their focus and may involve addressing a patient’s motivation to change, providing incentives for abstinence, building skills to resist drug use, replacing drug-using activities with constructive and rewarding nondrug-using activities, improving problem solving skills, improving family and community functioning and facilitating better interpersonal relationships. Also, participation in group therapy and other peer support programs during and following treatment can help maintain abstinence.

7. MEDICATIONS ARE AN IMPORTANT ELEMENT OF TREATMENT FOR MANY PATIENTS, ESPECIALLY WHEN COMBINED WITH COUNSELING AND OTHER BEHAVIORAL THERAPIES.
Opioid replacement therapy can be very effective in helping individuals stabilize their lives and reduce their drug use. For example, Suboxone (buprenorphine) is effective in helping individuals addicted to heroin, pain pills, or other opioids stabilize their lives and reduce their illicit drug use. Naltrexone is also an effective medication for some opioid-addicted individuals and some patients with alcohol dependence. Other medications for alcohol dependence include acamprosate, disulfuram, vivitrol, and topiramate. For persons addicted to nicotine, a nicotine replacement product (such as patches, gum, or lozenges) or an oral medication (such as bupropion or varenicline) can be an effective component of treatment when part of a comprehensive behavioral treatment program. Both behavioral treatments and medications can be critically important, especially for patients with mental disorders

8. ADDICTED OR DRUG-ABUSING INDIVIDUALS WITH COEXISTING MENTAL DISORDERS SHOULD HAVE BOTH DISORDERS TREATED IN AN INTEGRATED WAY. 
Substance use disorders (SUDS) and mental disorders often co-occur. Patients presenting for either condition should be assessed and treated for the co-occurrence of the other type of disorder.

9. MEDICALLY ASSISTED DETOXIFICATION IS ONLY THE FIRST STAGE OF ADDICTION TREATMENT AND BY ITSELF DOES LITTLE TO CHANGE LONG-TERM DRUG ABUSE. 
Although medically assisted detoxification can safely manage the acute physical symptoms of withdrawal and, for some, can pave the way for effective long-term addiction treatment, detoxification alone is rarely sufficient to help addicted individuals achieve long-term abstinence. Medical detoxification is a strongly indicated precursor to effective drug addiction treatment for some individuals. Thus, patients should be encouraged to continue drug treatment following detoxification. Motivational enhancement and incentive strategies, begun at initial patient intake, can improve treatment engagement.

10. TREATMENT DOES NOT NEED TO BE VOLUNTARY TO BE EFFECTIVE. 
Strong motivation can facilitate the treatment process. Sanctions or enticements from family, employment settings, or the criminal justice system can significantly increase treatment entry, retention rates, and the ultimate success of drug treatment interventions.

11. POSSIBLE DRUG USE DURING TREATMENT MUST BE MONITORED CONTINUOUSLY. 
It is not unusual for lapses to occur during treatment. Objective monitoring (urinalysis/other tests) helps patients withstand urges to use. Knowing their drug use is being monitored can be a powerful incentive for patients and can help them withstand urges to use drugs. Monitoring also provides an early indication of a return to drug use, signaling a possible need to adjust an individual’s treatment plan to better meet his or her needs. Feedback to patients who test positive for illicit drug use is an important element of monitoring.

12. TREATMENT PROGRAMS SHOULD ASSESS AND COUNSEL INDIVIDUALS ABOUT HIV/AIDS, HEPATITIS B AND C, TUBERCULOSIS, AND OTHER INFECTUOUS DISEASES. 
Counsel to avoid high-risk behavior. Counseling can also help those who are already infected to manage their illness.

13. RECOVERY FROM DRUG ADDICTION CAN BE A LONG-TERM PROCESS AND FREQUENTLY REQUIRES MULTIPLE EPISODES OF TREATMENT. 
As with other chronic illnesses, relapses can occur during or after successful treatment episodes. Individuals may require prolonged treatment and multiple episodes of treatment to achieve long-term abstinence and fully restored functioning. Participation in self-help support programs during and following treatment often is helpful in maintaining abstinence.

click button to:
A new window will open on a secure server for encryption of patient data and HIPAA compliance. Close window when submit is complete.

NOTE: Do not use dashes/symbols in phone #
................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
536 Signal Hill Dr Ext  |  Statesville, NC  28625  |  Ph: 704-872-0234  |  Fx:  704-818-1115
Addiction Recovery Medical Services (A.R.M.S.) | ©2009-2016 All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy | ArmsCanHelp.com